The Alimond Show

Giannina McBryde of All Smiles Leesburg

October 12, 2023 Alimond Studio
The Alimond Show
Giannina McBryde of All Smiles Leesburg
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

What would you do for love? Would you maintain a long-distance relationship for three years, marked by month-long gaps peppered with flowers? Would you move across hemispheres to chase a passion and a dream? Our guest this episode did just that, and she's here to share her heartwarming journey. The love story that started on a Miami to Peru flight, blossomed amidst long-distance challenges, and came to a full circle with a rewarding career in dentistry in the United States. As she recounts her story peppered with resilience, romance, and root canals, you’ll find yourself rooting for her and her inspiring journey.

Our guest also takes us down her professional path, providing a first-hand account of the trials and triumphs of being a dentist. She battled through a polar vortex to reach a university in Cleveland, volunteered at a university hospital, and consistently pushed boundaries to become the successful dentist she is today. She also shares her strategies on handling dental anxiety in patients, transforming their fears into smiles. But this isn't just about fillings and flossing, it's about the power of love, the essence of commitment, and the impact of a supportive partner. So, buckle up for an episode that's as heartfelt as it is insightful.

Speaker 1:

English is a little hard, you know, but I try my best. Yeah, that was the closest thing I had in like interview wise. That's the only thing.

Speaker 2:

What was it about? Like dental related things?

Speaker 1:

Yes yes, of course there was an old dentistry topics about dentistry, yeah, what do you miss most about food?

Speaker 2:

Food?

Speaker 1:

I should have saved family first. I didn't have to think about that. My family, of course. I had to say that.

Speaker 2:

What family do you have in Peru?

Speaker 1:

My father is still there, my mom, she just went to Peru yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Oh fun.

Speaker 1:

Nice. So she's going to be there three weeks and she lives here. Ok, my dad, he's there, he's the lawyer, he has his own things, but, yep, I am here. What brought you here, love? Ok, tell me about that, my husband. So I'm going to cry. So that's going to happen for sure at any time here.

Speaker 2:

Can I get your shoes please?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, my husband was dropping me off and he's like. I just want to tell you yeah. Yeah, no, he said. I just want to tell you that you are amazing and I love you so much and you're stunning and all that's.

Speaker 2:

You've all only been together for like three months, right? I'm sorry You've only been together for three months, right, my husband.

Speaker 1:

No, that's a good one. I'm like wait a minute. So no, it's going to be 11 years next week.

Speaker 2:

Nice.

Speaker 1:

And he just told me and I said I forgot to bring my T-shirt he was ready, you know, and I like it. So, yes, love. So I met him on a plane when I was going to I was coming back from continued education in Miami Beach, going back to Peru, so he was going on a vacation trip, so he was going through all South America, so he was next to me that the weather was awful, the plane was like a lot of shaky, that was really bad. And I was like OK. But then he's like, are you OK? I'm like yeah, I never imagined, never, never. I didn't think about coming to the States to work as a dentist. Not at all. So I was. I was really successful in Peru, my own own practice and I was working for three more mental practices and I was all good. But then we start to chatting and then he left in Bogota and then I kept, I kept going to Peru. Then we exchange cards and he's like are you a dentist? And I'm like yeah, and he's a dental partner at that time, meaning he was in a business industry of dental business, running practices and a lot of doctors and everything. And he's like, wow, but never imagined. So then he, he, we connect for that was like two years or three years, you know, connecting emails like one, yeah. And then we he said so I had to come here to visit a university of Maryland. And then I went there for six months I stay here in Maryland and then he was visiting. He was living in Ohio at that time and he was visiting. He was driving every weekend just to get a coffee and then from Ohio to Maryland just to get a coffee. And then I didn't know, I didn't know where Ohio was, I didn't know anything about it.

Speaker 2:

But you're telling me that he drove there just to get a coffee so that he could friend into you.

Speaker 1:

Yes, you had planned, we planned. But again, friends, all friends, that's a very good friend. I didn't even understand it at that time. So I'm telling you 15, 18 years ago.

Speaker 2:

I'm like I just that's a minute. Right, my friend made me realize that I didn't even know so many hours is that I think it was eight hours Because, like you, realize that he drives eight hours, but I didn't mean Six in, I'm just to see you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but I didn't know the map of the United States at that time. I'm Peruvian.

Speaker 2:

I'm Latino.

Speaker 1:

I know Columbia, brazil, ecuador. I know where it is, but I didn't know. I was focused on my training here. And then my friends like, do you know where is Ohio? I'm like Cleveland. I'm like, no, oh, like 30 minutes. She pulled him up and she's like look at this. I'm like is he driving, like everything? I'm like, and she's like, yeah, you have to realize something. And then I realized but I had to go back to my country, to Peru. So then he's like, yeah, months pass and then seems like things were like a little different. And then, long and short, we got together. Like he visited me in Peru several times, he went to my practices, he saw how I was working.

Speaker 2:

He just like Did he give you any tips at least?

Speaker 1:

No, he was like be quiet on the research area. He knew where he was. Yeah, he was like so quiet I'm like he showed my patients leave from the operator room and then he's, and then at the end he just told me I have been working with Dennis for so many years. I've never, never, ever saw a child crying leaving your office. Like he was, the kid wasn't tears because he just wanted to be with me more time, you know, like enjoying, not because he was scared of you, but because he wanted to stay with you. He wanted to stay with me, I don't want to leave, I don't want to leave, and he that's something that probably he's like wow, I love it, love it so, and it All of those things. And then years after we decided to be dating, to start dating. So I was still in Peru with my practices and then he came at visit. Sometimes Like it was kind of a long distance relationship, always flowers, you know, every month flowers from him. And then, yeah, then we decided to have a relationship finally. So and he, we decided to that was 11 years ago 11 years ago, like probably 12. Like I could engage for a year.

Speaker 2:

And then, how many kids do you have now?

Speaker 1:

Just a daughter I have one, yes, one daughter, I can call her, she's six, yes, she's six.

Speaker 2:

What would you say has been like your like most? Besides this amazing journey of finding the love of your life, what would you say is one of the most like, profound, aha, oh my gosh. Moments since 12 years ago, like since your whole journey traveling here, falling in love, learning the culture, just everything.

Speaker 1:

When I finally got my license as a dentist in the United States of America. How did that feel like it was amazing. I told you I would cry.

Speaker 2:

You're a pretty crier though.

Speaker 1:

So I'm a foreign trained dentist. I love what I do.

Speaker 2:

Sarah, what you've been grabbing.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh, I'm sorry, you see, this is all my fault. No, no, no, no, you're good, you're okay, no no, you're good. I forgot the tissues.

Speaker 2:

No, you're okay. It's okay. You're a foreign trained. I'm a foreign trained.

Speaker 1:

I have been. I finished the only school in 03. I started dentistry when I was 16 years old. I went through all the tests, examinations and all that stuff. Thank you, just in case, is that okay? So I got. So I finished when I was 21 and then I was working really hard and then I was in my 10th year after I finished the last school of dentistry in Peru. So when I came here as a foreign trained, you are nobody in this, in a foreign country, in a foreign language totally different. I'm fluent in Spanish, it's my natural tongue, but here it was totally different. I was used to be independent drive my car, go to my practices, I had my routine gym, yoga and all that stuff. When I came here, I was depending on my husband. So I changed my status and I was no professional. So something that my parents always put in my brain, it's just my culture. You have to choose a career. So I wanted to be a dentist since I was 12 years old with my orthodontist. She was amazing. So I'm like I want to be here, I want to be here. So, anyway, when you come to the stage, your title, your license, it's nothing. So you have to go through all the training again. And I was now young, I was now 20. And then I had to go. I was 23. So don't tell me so and then I had to restart. Then there were so many things happen and that little, that a few years to get that license. So the time that I got the license in my hands I couldn't believe. I said I did it. How'd you celebrate? Oh, my gosh, just pray a lot, a lot, and I was thankful to God and my husband, my parents. I couldn't have done any of this without my husband and my parents. They helped me a lot. There was one time that my husband was like it's OK, you can give up. It's OK. I was studying for my boards because you have two. It used to be, now it's different. So two national boards, one regional board, which is a lot. The national boards used to be two days One day, eight hours and 30 minutes of exam, and the other day was four hours and 30 minutes. So you just do the math, it's like 12 hours. And then the regional boards with the patients. It was so stressful and everything. And then they couldn't believe to do that again. And then I had to go to the residency, which it was amazing. It was an amazing experience in Mercy Health in Ohio. Then I met wonderful people and then I got my license after somebody's.

Speaker 2:

What would you give advice to somebody who is traveling, because I hear that story a lot Is. I was a doctor, I was an engineer, I was a scientist in my home country. I come here and I have absolutely no credentials. I'm working at Target or Walmart until I can, just so I can support my family. Until I can go through that whole process again, what type of advice would you give about staying modest or about I don't even know? What would you say to somebody who is in the thick of it right now?

Speaker 1:

Be humble. When I came, I realized so there is a little story about it. So I came from Peru, south America, to Ohio, cleveland, ohio and a polar vortex in 2012. Nice, it was nice. So I was in the apartment, my husband was working and I said I had to do something. I want to be a dentist, I need to volunteer. At least I want to be with my dental people. So I took a metro and then I left two blocks earlier, two blocks before the— you were supposed to get off, yeah. I was going to Case Western Reserve University just to give my services for free or shadowing or do something, and then I left two blocks earlier I left the bus. I was with my loan jacket and I'm petite, look at me. So I was walking In the polar vortex. Yes, I was the only one out, so I felt like a hand that was pushing me back, just pushing me back. It wasn't the wind, no.

Speaker 2:

Yes, it was a wind.

Speaker 1:

I felt like a hand. The wind was all shooting at me and all that snow was on my face and I keep walking. In my mind I said, janina, nobody send you here. You to the decision to follow love, so just embrace it, keep going, embrace it. This is my goal, this is your goal. You have to do it. So I keep walking and walking and finally arrived to University Hospitals, which is near to Case so, and I went and it was all wet. And then the assistant of the dean, she's like what are you doing here? She have never met me in her life and I said I just want to give you my CV. And then I really wanted to volunteer here or shadow or something. I'm a dentist from South America. And then I wanted to just be with you guys.

Speaker 2:

Look, I might have hypothermia, right now Please just stop this.

Speaker 1:

I was on fire. So I didn't feel like cold at all. I was on fire because I was. I was determined to do it, you know so. And she's like, of course, of course, could you just stay here? And then I, then my husband, called and said, where are you? I said, at Case, what are you doing out? And then you know and so and so, and I said it's okay, I can go back. But boss, no, no, no, I will pick you. He leave work. And he got to pick me up and took me back. Like what happened? I need to do something. I really wanted to be a dentist we already talk about so but it's not that way. There's so many ways to do things. Well, my English was not, as you know, it was not good. I'm still working on it but it was different. Like 11 years ago I got it. So I receive a phone call days after like you are accepted, just come shadow. And I'm like, yes, just putting my scraps up and then just go there and feeling the hospital environment. That's my thing. You know that I love it. I love to do the industry. 20 years after, I still love to do the industry. I love my patients, I love the connections. You know they are a lot to me. You know that just build this strong relationship Like it just means a lot to me. You know your story is so powerful.

Speaker 2:

It gives me like so many feelings for how much passion you have for not just your profession, but just like the motivation behind all of it. That's amazing.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so that's the main thing I would say stay humble, don't give up. There are so many things that are going to happen, that's for sure. Life is not easy.

Speaker 2:

I could see you. If they didn't accept you, I could see you opening up a little corner shop, free dental checkups. I will I will.

Speaker 1:

If it's not, I'm not. I was not allowed to touch any patient to be a dentist in this country, you know.

Speaker 2:

Not not US license, but we'll check for cavities and give you a good cleaning.

Speaker 1:

I can give you a professional opinion how to brush your teeth, let's floss. So, yes, yes, it was that, it's that. And then there are so many people. Yes, as you said, just keep going. Determination, I'm just. I was so determined to do it, to get my things done to conquer.

Speaker 2:

You know, what resources do you have off the top of your head for people, not necessarily just for the dental world, but just overall? Did you run into something where you're like, thank God, there is this resource here that helped me get through this, this part in my life?

Speaker 1:

My husband.

Speaker 2:

Was he available for everybody that needs help?

Speaker 1:

He was available for, for, for a lot, you know for good things, bad things, for everything, for everything.

Speaker 2:

So just kind of finding your person.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes, Like it means a lot. Somebody believes on you and supports you and is there every single time that you want to cry yeah, you want to cry because somebody treat you weird, you know. And then you're just so upset, so uncomfortable. How dare this person is treating me this way. I am a doctor. How dare you know? But here, stay humble. Yeah, Keep it calm. You don't know if this person had problems or you don't know You're. I'm blessed every day. You know. Some days are good, another days are amazing. Yeah, but just have to understand some people. But it's tough.

Speaker 2:

So to find your person. Get on a flight from Miami to Peru and you might run into your person.

Speaker 1:

Well, I I now I know your, your, your question. So it's um, I mean he, I mean he, just I found him.

Speaker 2:

First of all, what's his name? We've been talking about him the entire time. You have to at least give him a shout out, andy.

Speaker 1:

Okay, yes, andy McPri, yes, andy, that's my husband he is my husband.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yes, very cool, all right. So, in terms of resources because our audience are business professionals, loudoun County, northern Virginia, listeners what like top books or what top programs helped you in business? Like is there something besides Andy Okay, I'm going to mention him in a minute Are there any like resources, books or programs that help you?

Speaker 1:

So I would say there is a lot. I would say I watch a lot of YouTube videos. So in dental school you learn the skills right, but nobody teaches you how to manage your business. It's really hard, it's really tough to be a clinician and at the same time do the administrative part, the marketing and all that stuff. So get a person, get a person to do all of that for you, because if you don't want to burn out, if you want to be happy doing what you are doing, so Andy, right on cue Andy. So he is the business side of my business. He's the one who does all of that stuff. I'm so happy, blessed to have him because I can dedicate my entire time just to my clinical skills, to my patients. You can outsource, you can hire someone to do that, and then it's going to be light on you, it's going to be much better on you. You don't have to think about anything Since the answering machines and the marketing area or all that stuff. I'm a kind of the clinical side. I do instruments, materials and all that stuff, but I don't take care of the marketing side or all the administrative staff's, the insurance's or all that stuff Otherwise.

Speaker 2:

I would be… you could feel overwhelming.

Speaker 1:

right, I know I get it. It could be overwhelming. Books, I mean, I have… there's so many, so many books out there.

Speaker 2:

Is there one that comes to mind? Or like oh, this one really helped me.

Speaker 1:

I am reading right now… Well, it's an audiobook. It's about how to… I don't remember the title. What is it about? It's about how to… make people engage with you. So social relations are really important. Like super, super important is how I build my things through social connections, like people, people, they are people, they are not. My patients are people, they are not. Oh, there's a patient with a crown. There's a patient with a veneer.

Speaker 2:

There's a patient with a piece of land. There are veneers and crowns. They're like humans, they are humans. Yes, yes, Challenges that you can help them overcome.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes is how they are. I have, I build wonderful relationships with them. I wanna know a little bit more and I'll always know see about, how are you, what are you doing?

Speaker 2:

You're curious, you love people. That's what it comes down to right.

Speaker 1:

I love to do that. They already know I have a daughter. Where is she going to school? What is she doing? Because it's just, I love to chat. It's like that. It's awesome talking, building relationships, and that's really important.

Speaker 2:

And I'm sure they love the fact that you carry enough about them to open up, because I've seen lots of different dentists and doctors just over my lifetime and a lot of people wanna get in there and get out, which there's nothing wrong with that. But when you have a human connection to somebody, you fall in love with them and you care and you get excited when you see them and it just makes your day so much better If you become that person to them, and so the fact that you've opened yourself up so much to allow that to happen with all your patients, I think is a beautiful thing. Thank you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love it. I love just to. I just I always talk as a team. You know, are we ready to flaws? Are we doing this one together? Some patients look at me like wait, it's me, it's not we, you know.

Speaker 2:

But I'm a team, I'm your cheerleader. Yes, yes, I'm your instructor.

Speaker 1:

I'm your cheerleader.

Speaker 2:

I ask cheerleader.

Speaker 1:

I do, I always do, I do always do my 20%, but you are doing your 80%. We're a team, we're here together in this, so it's how I work. You know, I love that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love it. So, before we wrap up, is there anything specifically that you're like? I really wanna share this with the world. Okay, that's a big question.

Speaker 1:

Yes, it is a really good question. I wanna share with the world that I'm so passionate about what I'm doing, that I love doing the industry and I love doing just connect with people you know.

Speaker 2:

I think that's been very evident, Okay.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I just love it. I love it Again some days, you know, and then it's not too pleasant that if you meet someone and is seated in your chair and then it's not you. But I hate the dentist.

Speaker 2:

I hate the same thing.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

With pictures, so I get it. It's not you, but I absolutely yes.

Speaker 1:

Oh no, yes, so they are in charge of you know. Just repeating that to you over and over and over and over, and it used to be a little harsh for me, you know, but then I embrace it again, you know, embrace it. You know that would be a good advice, embrace it.

Speaker 2:

You know what I say now, yeah, is when people come in and I see them start to say it I know I get it. You hate the camera, you hate getting your pictures taken, you're not, I'm not gonna take any good pictures of you, I've heard it all. And they'll be like, oh, I'm like wait. But the people that say that come back again and again, so you're in good hands, and so they're like, oh, okay, like they can't say it again cause I just said it all for them so you could be the dentist for people. Not that you get a lot of these types of patients, but I am the dentist for people who hate coming to the dentist. Oh, and so then when they come in, they're like you're the person for me and I don't have to tell you, cause you already know that's a good one, I love it love it, I would try to do it.

Speaker 1:

Embrace it, that's a good one. Yes, embrace it, that's the main thing. Just, you don't know what is happening with this person. And then patients come to my office. They are super stress-ancient and I get it because they hear or happen that really bad things happen to them, just bad situations, yes, yes. So I understand. Now it's like it's a challenge to me. I'm like I'm gonna help the patient break the chain, you know, because your grandparents told you and they were like parents. So this is a challenge to me. And I said and I love it. You know, I talk to them. They are super nervous, super anxious, and then seven minutes later they laugh, we smile, we laugh, we joke, and then just everybody in the paratory, you know, everybody in the practice list, and that we are laughing. They go out to the front desk, they do the next you know appointment. They're happy. I've never thought this is gonna be a good experience. They said, and I changed it yes, I did it.

Speaker 2:

You see, embrace it, embrace it and boom. Yes, yes. Thank you so much for being on the podcast. I had such an amazing time talking with you and learning about your not just your love story, but your overall story.

Speaker 1:

Thank, you so much for having me. It was fun, amazing. I didn't, I didn't you didn't cry too much.

Speaker 2:

No, I didn't. I told you I needed a tissue to touch the box.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much for having me. You're welcome, thank you.

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